Bold drawings give DACA recipients a face in STC exhibition

NANCY MOYER | SPECIAL TO THE MONITOR Delving deeply into his core, South Texas College art instructor Luis Corpus engages the viewer in his exhibition,...

First baby of 1998 an Aggie grad

The first baby born in Brownsville in 1998 is now a college graduate.  Valeria Ramos’ father proudly graduated from Texas A&M University College Station in Lubbock in 1985, then her older sister went on to be an Aggie also, graduating in 2016. So, it was not a surprise that Valeria sought Aggieland.  In fact, when Valeria was featured on The Brownsville Herald’s front page on Jan. 2, 1998, J. Noel Espinoza wrote: “Brownsville’s first baby of 1998 may grow up to be a Texas A&M Aggie.” Read the full story at themonitor.com.

Theater of the border: Moyer’s wearable art exhibit tackles region’s misconceptions

BY DONNA MASON SWEIGARTJewelry, as an art form, is rarely expressed in single artist shows. That is why this solo show of wearable art...

Nonprofit continues to support students to, and through, college

The transition from high school to college can be a daunting step as it is. Now, as students also face unprecedented obstacles that the coronavirus pandemic has brought to education systems, nonprofit College Scholarship Leadership Access Program, or CSLAP, has been working to support local seniors through the process of college admissions.  Through workshops and mentorship with university students, the Rio Grande Valley-based organization works with high school juniors and seniors to  prepare them for college. Workshops cover a range of topics, including professionalism, campus policy, and budgeting.  The last several months of a school year are integral for seniors to get assistance in getting ready for university life, so CSLAP has been hosting several virtual panels to answer questions they may have. Read the full story at themonitor.com.

Visitors greeted to artist’s family, friend and colleagues in STC exhibit

Eduardo E. Aguilar Sr. knows how to capture a likeness. On display at the VAM Gallery at South Texas College, “Characters & Creatures” demonstrates...

Far from home, UTRGV athlete recovering from surgery embraced by hospital staff

When she couldn’t be with her family, Talita Olivera De Paula adopted a new one: the staff at Edinburg Regional Medical Center. The family of the 24-year-old native of São Paulo in Brazil couldn’t be there for her college graduation or at her bedside when she was recovering from spinal surgery. That’s when the Edinburg Regional staff stepped up. “I was there without my family, and they turned into my family,” De Paula said of the nurses, physicians and physical therapist who helped her during her three-week recovery after spinal surgery at the Edinburg hospital on April 29. Read the full story at themonitor.com.

Brownsville Film Society seeks to lure production

The easier it is to make movies in and around Brownsville, the more movies will be made in and around Brownsville. That’s the thinking behind...

Garden cleanup held to honor historic black church’s impact in McAllen

Hector Vargas said he can still hear the worship songs here at the Little Bethel Baptist Church more than 60 years later. The choir voice used to serenade his whole neighborhood. The church, the first African-American church in the city and a historic landmark recognized by the state, was torn down about 20 years ago. Bethel Garden now occupies the land in honor of it. On Saturday morning, more than a dozen people came together to clean up the garden to commemorate Juneteenth, which is Friday. Community members from across the Rio Grande Valley, some as young as 10-years-old, were seen planting flowers, repainting benches and pulling weeds.  Read the full story at themonitor.com.

Finding hope: Harlingen couple promotes lupus awareness

HARLINGEN — It was a step forward. That’s all it took for Jay Garcia to decide to retire from a top management position in a...

Project delves into Paredes’ Cold War journals

Noreen Rivera, an associate professor at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, is quietly pulling back the curtain on a period in Américo Paredes’ life when the Brownsville-born scholar worked as a journalist in the Far East during the U.S. occupation of Japan at the dawn of the Cold War after World War II. Paredes, who lived from 1915-1999, was a folklorist, scholar and professor at the University of Texas at Austin who is widely acknowledged as one of the most important Mexican-American scholars of the 20th century. Read the full story at themonitor.com.