Steve Clark

125 POSTS 0 COMMENTS
Steve Clark is a staff writer with the Brownsville Herald. He can be reached at sclark@brownsvilleherald.com

Rocket fans tune in from all over for SpaceX

Tens of thousands of pairs of eyes were fixed to computer screens around the globe the last several weeks, staring at live-stream images of...

SN5 finally hops: SpaceX nails first full-size Starship prototype flight

After aborting planned test flights late Monday and again Tuesday morning, SpaceX on Tuesday evening successfully flew its Starship SN5 prototype and set it...

Farewell rain, hello heat

In case you’re wondering why the rain kept coming in the Rio Grande Valley days after Hurricane Hanna blew through, and whether it was...

SpaceX conducts successful engine test

After weeks of delays, SpaceX at 3:02 p.m. on Thursday conducted a successful static-fire engine test of its SN5 Starship prototype at the company’s...

Cameron County death toll higher than reported

The official death count from COVID-19 in Cameron County is about to get a lot higher, according to Dr. James Castillo, public health authority for the county health department. Speaking at a Monday county press conference, he said keeping an accurate, day-to-day tally has been hampered by the fact that doctors have been preoccupied with trying to save lives, leaving little time for paperwork, while health department staff — who still rely heavily on paper documents and faxes — have been overwhelmed. “I’ve been saying that the number of deaths is going to lag the number of cases by a month or more,” Castillo said. “Our department, Cameron County Public Health, we have families too. We get sick too. We have not grown as the cases have grown. We’ve shrunk even.” Read the full story at themonitor.com

Virus veterans share experience of NY surge

As the Rio Grande Valley continues to experience a massive surge in COVID-19 cases and related deaths, those who listened in to U.S. Rep. Filemon Vela’s telephone town hall on Wednesday heard advice from two medical professionals who helped get the virus under control in New York City. One of them was Israel Rocha Jr., an Elsa native and former CEO of Doctors Hospital Renaissance in Edinburg, now CEO of NYC Health + Hospitals/Elmhurst, the Queens hospital that got hit early and hard by the pandemic. The other was Dr. Joseph Masci with Mount Sinai, among New York’s top infectious disease specialists. Read the full story at themonitor.com

Hospitals wading through tragedy daily

What Dr. Beverly Zavaleta encounters in her job on a daily basis should be enough to convince even the most nonchalant among us not to roll the dice on COVID-19. As the number of cases and deaths continues to surge in Brownsville, the hospitalist and physician adviser for Valley Baptist Medical Center Brownsville told The Brownsville Herald that, while many patients recover and return home, many do not. Older COVID-19 patients who have to intubated — placed on a ventilator— are the least likely to survive, she said. “Always the older patients fare worse, especially when we look at the deaths,” Zavaleta said. Read the full story at themonitor.com

NY virus veterans speak; Share experience of surge in COVID-19 cases

As the Rio Grande Valley continues to experience a massive surge in COVID-19 cases and related deaths, those who listened in to U.S. Rep. Filemon Vela’s telephone town hall on Wednesday heard advice from two medical professionals who helped get the virus under control in New York City. One of them was Israel Rocha Jr., an Elsa native and former CEO of Doctors Hospital Renaissance in Edinburg, now CEO of NYC Health + Hospitals/Elmhurst, the Queens hospital that got hit early and hard by the pandemic. The other was Dr. Joseph Masci with Mount Sinai, among New York’s top infectious disease specialists. Their experiences could help the Valley navigate the crisis now that COVID-19 is running rampant here. Read the full story at themonitor.com

Shrimp industry pushing for exemption

BROWNSVILLE — When Donald Trump announced on June 22 that he was suspending new work visas for foreign workers at least through the end of the year, Andrea Hance experienced a wave of anxiety. The executive director of the Texas Shrimp Association said it’s already a struggle to get enough foreign seasonal workers to adequately crew shrimp boats every year because of the federal government’s annual cap on H-2B visas. Now the fear was that — despite an “essential industry” designation —the state’s shrimp industry wouldn’t be able to get any foreign workers, which would mean no fishing and no income, since the pool of American citizens willing and able to do the dangerous, backbreaking work of shrimping is extremely shallow. Read more at The Monitor.com.

County beach access to remain closed

Yes, you can still go to the beach this Fourth of July weekend, just not through a county-controlled access point, all of which will be closed at least through July 13 by order of Cameron County Judge Eddie Trevino Jr., responding to the wave of COVID-19 infections spreading through the Valley — the vast majority of it due to large gatherings and people not wearing masks or social distancing. So unless you can access county beaches by water or air, that leaves the city of South Padre Island, whose council members voted in an emergency meeting Tuesday not to close the Island’s numerous public and private access points, though the council did approve restrictions on beach-chair and umbrella vendors in an attempt to promote social distancing and discourage large gatherings.