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Hateful neighbors

When people use hateful words to describe their neighbors, words that summon fear that is irrational, I wonder, why? How have I become your enemy when we have never met? What has put you into such a rage?

Social Security, of which I am a recipient, was enacted to ensure that old people who have no family of means will be able to live modestly in their golden years. It is socialism and I am grateful for it. How does this threaten you?

Sydney Roby
Weslaco


Wrong focus on veterans

Imelda Coronado says Mr. Trump expanded the Veteran Choice Program while Mr. Biden never has done anything (Letters, Sept. 18). Correct me if I’m wrong, but wasn’t the Obama administration, in which Mr. Biden was vice president, that passed the bill in 2014?

And as to the claim that the lowlife cowards never have named any of their sources, wasn’t it Fox, which is Trump’s own friendly network, that broke the story about Trump calling dead military heroes losers and suckers?

Jesus Rodriguez
Elsa


Enraged cyclist

I experienced my first brush with road rage — not with a motorist but with a bicyclist. Furious that I did not change lanes to pass him on shoulder-less Bentsen Road, he caught me at the next light and yelled obscenities and kicked my car door. His displaced approach prevented my offering an apology and saying that I had just forgotten. Instead I was forced to consider the reality of the situation.

If motorists and bicyclists share the roadways equally by law, why aren’t bicyclists compelled to display registered license plates so the owners can be readily identified? Why are bicyclists allowed to travel well below speed limits (blocking traffic), and why don’t ever I see them being cited for failing to indicate a turn, for example? Just last week I saw three Mission bicycle cops turn north off East Griffin Parkway in unison and not one arm signaled.

Tax paying aside, the fundamental difference between motorists and bicyclists is that motorists are generally trying to get somewhere. Bicyclists, however, are usually just exercising. In this light, the roads are not shared equally.

When I learned to drive, my brother told me the goal was to reach my destination safely and not to cause any other motorist to adjust to my driving. The irate bicyclist I encountered never received that lesson, apparently. Instead his reaction was not only hypocritical but criminal.

Perhaps the utilization of bike lanes or lazy streets is a viable solution bicyclists should consider whenever possible.

Danny Martinez
McAllen


USPS, officials draw criticism

What are the working hours for our U.S. senators?

I needed help from my senators, so off went an email and I guess it wound up in never land!

The U.S. Postal Service is really goofed up due to ideology being appointed to the top ranks in the service, in my opinion. I had my bank send a check to a hospital in Edinburg to pay for services rendered to me. Guess what happened? The check apparently was in one of those sorting machines that were ordered to be dismantled and wound up in the landfill or sold to some metal dealer, or could have been sold to a competitor.

The check never reached the hospital and they told me when I stopped there to give them my credit card to settle the bill. “One whole week’s payment of mail never got to the hospital.”

Now I have the check out there in never land and the bank has deducted the amount from my account, which means I am out this money or I can pay $31 to stop payment on the check that I never have seen.

Have I heard any responses from my U.S. senator? No I haven’t at this time, and my odds of getting help with the post office from them is slim to none.

When we lived in Atlanta I sent letters to my congressman, Newt Gingrich, with my needs or suggestions for better government. I always got a form letter thanking me for my concerns and comments. Nothing from him personally. So I started writing letters to the newspaper. Those letters, if critical of Congress members, usually got a response from them in either a phone call or letter to me.

Automation is supposed to replace humans and be cheaper for productivity’s sake. Why in the world would the USPS hire more people to sort mail in this day and age of automation? There has to be an ulterior motive behind these shenanigans, either pontifical or monetary.

On the day I wrote this letter Sen. Cruz showed up on the floor of the Senate to cast a vote. Here is my beef: It looked like he had came from the gym, either playing games or doing workouts. He was wearing shorts and a T-shirt or pullover and it looked like it was sweat soaked. How in the world can the Senate do its job when they operate with such little regard for the taxpayers who support their lavish lifestyle?

I would like them to put in 40 hours a week doing their job just like the rest of us do here in real life. They can raise money on the off-duty hours and go to beer joints if they like, but do it after they take care of their job responsibilities

Bill Williams
Palmview


Wrong kind of exposure

A previous letter writer corrects me about former Vice President Biden having his sexual misconduct accusations not being swept under the rug and under-reported by the media, and boy he was right. In fact, previous allegations are coming to light via an inspector general’s report, where female Secret Service agents requested to opt out of protection details for the former vice president due to his casual nudity; he skinny-dipped, exposing himself to female agents, according to a book by Ronald Kessler.

I guess I was wrong; the media supposedly will review these incidents once the report is reexamined and delve into his crude and perverted behavior. No wonder he earned the nickname “Creepy Joe.”

Jake Longoria
Mission


Cornyn opposed

In voting this fall, we need to vote Sen. John Cornyn out of office and vote Ms. M.J. Hegar in as our Texas senator. Mr. Cornyn is Mitch McConnell’s right-hand man. Mr. McConnell is sitting on more than 300 bills passed by the House that he doesn’t want to have the Senate vote on. Talk about “do nothing” — that is Mr. McConnell’s and Mr. Cornyn’s position.

In addition, Mr. Cornyn continues to remain silent on Mr. Trump’s lies, ignorance and attacks on credible institutions such as the press, FBI, CDC, courts and military. He has nothing to say about Trump’s racism, negative comments about women and lack of responsibility in the COVID-19 pandemic.

All of this makes one more than wonder about Mr. Cornyn’s moral and ethical values. He really seems scared of Trump and McConnell. With Ms. Hegar we will be getting a decorated veteran who will put Texas and Texans first and who will work to get more Texans covered by health insurance and other problems (prescription drug costs) that Cornyn doesn’t seem to care about.

Cornyn’s main job seems to be to do whatever Trump and McConnell want him to do and to satisfy his big corporate donors.

It is time to bring Cornyn home and get ourselves someone who will represent all Texans in the Senate.

Robert Soper
Edinburg


Questions on abortion

I do not understand why Congress went to the Supreme Court to pass the abortion law. I know why now; they did not have the votes in the House, so they took a shortcut through the Supreme Court. The thing is that the Supreme Court is not designed to pass laws, only Congress can.

Call it unethical or illegal. It is both.

The Supreme Court had no business passing a law. We the people were never asked to vote on it, not even once. They snuck that one on us without asking how we feel about it. And the Holocaust against the unborn began and that was over 30 years ago.

How can that be legal in America?

Rafael Madrigal
Pharr

Editor’s note: Roe v. Wade challenged a Texas law banning abortion. Congress has passed several laws regulating abortion after the ruling.

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