Compromise on immigrants

A humanitarian crisis emerged due to a tremendous increase of undocumented immigrants arriving to the southwest border, causing the reassignment of Customs and Border Protection officers and delays at ports of entry.

As someone who has experienced the slow-moving traffic on the bridge, it’s time-consuming and frustrating. I ponder whether long-term consequences that could take place have been considered.

Reducing staffing at ports of entry was a sudden move that is impacting negatively. Closing the border for one day would be the equivalent of losing $1.7 billion in trade, affecting jobs and paychecks, moreover, leading to economic change.

I think major businesses such as commercial trucks and important imports such as machinery, oil and agricultural products that cross to the U.S. should not be ignored but instead reinforce the facility of trade and travel.

Since the Department of Homeland Security moved agents from working at the ports to process undocumented migrants, pedestrians and passenger vehicles crossing the Mexican border face wait times topping seven hours.

Traditionally, tourists help raise retail sales during holidays such as Semana Santa. However, it can be predicted that long wait times could discourage thousands of tourists from wanting to come and shop.

I believe we can secure the border without impeding entry. In the same way, we are experiencing overcapacity and a shift of resources and personnel. That said, a possible solution would be an agreement or cooperation between the two political parties that oppose each other’s policies.

Itzel Perez, McAllen


Don’t blame the utensils

Annie Oakley, while traveling in 1889 with Buffalo Bill Cody’s Wild West Show in Germany, shot the cigar out of the mouth of the German Kaiser with her rifle to thrill the entire crowd. Lee Harvey Oswald used a rifle to shoot out the brains of an American president that horrified the entire nation. A rifle is a rifle.

Capt. “Sully” Sullenberger successfully landed his plane in the Hudson River to save his entire crew and passengers, that would be later remembered as the “Miracle on the Hudson” on Jan. 15, 2009. On Sept 11, 2001, Islamic jihadist terrorists flew four planes into the World Trade Centers, the Pentagon and a field in Pennsylvania that ultimately killed almost 3,000 Americans. Planes are planes.

A scalpel in the hands of a skilled heart surgeon can save a beating heart, but a scalpel in the hands of an MS-13 criminal can cut out a beating heart. A scalpel is a scalpel.

A baseball bat in the hands of Al Capone can crack open the skulls of two disloyal thugs, but a baseball bat in the hands of Babe Ruth can crack two home runs out of Yankee Stadium. A baseball bat is a baseball bat.

An eternal truth that common-sense conservatives always remember but bleeding heart liberals have long forgotten is that good people will do good with the things they have and bad people will do bad with the things they have. And all the laws, rules, regulations and gun-free zone signs will never change that eternal truth.

Jack Ayoub, Harlingen


Federal debt rose in Obama’s term

According to the Fact Check report dated Feb. 26:

“The national debt can be divided into two parts — the amount owed to the public, including private citizens, foreign governments and international investors, and what’s known as intragovernmental holdings, the amount owed to the Social Security Trust Fund and other government accounts.

“While the national debt has been increasing for decades due to near-annual budget deficits, it grew dramatically under Obama, increasing from $10.6 trillion in January 2009 to $19.9 trillion in January 2017, according to Treasury Department figures.”

Imelda Coronado, Mission

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