LETTERS: Tariff dispute, ‘lawless’ border, honor servicemen

Mexicans paying the price for tariff dispute

The Mexican government’s lack of concern for its own people never ceases to amaze me. They recently retaliated by imposing many new tariffs on U.S. goods, including a 25 percent tax on imported U.S. pork. As we all know, pork is a Mexican food staple used in many Mexican dishes, such as “carnitas.” So now, Mexicans wishing to eat pork will have to pay a higher price for their main source of protein.

The two countries are in a tariff dispute, but the ones that pay the price are the poor Mexican people who barely make ends meet. And with Lopez-Obrador coming on board as president of Mexico in December, I don’t see things getting any better.

Why? Our two presidents’ political views are extremely opposite. One is to the extreme right and the other is to the extreme left.

Guadalupe E. Aguirre, Edinburg

 

Fed up with ‘lawless’ southern border

Is 15 million undocumented, Spanish speaking, illegal immigrants finally enough rushing our borders? The United States is a dumping ground for the world’s poor, orphans and criminals. We have 13 million adults and 2 million DACA and minor children who think just by crossing the border, by any means necessary, that they can get on the gravy train and meld into American society.

They come unprepared not knocking English, penniless, poor, uneducated, with large families to feed, clothe and house. Then we have undue pressure on services in society with the schools, hospitals, jobs and lowering wages for the entire country, stealing American citizens’ jobs.

Many adults commit misdemeanor and felony crimes on law-abiding Americans. Many are ruthless MS-13 gang members.

We have argued about this over and over before, but legal entry just feels better.

The United States is fed up with our lawless southern border, and everyone in South Texas has earned and deserved the impending wall, because the people here have made a fortune smuggling drugs and undocumented illegal immigrants for centuries. Not to mention gun running and money-laundering for themselves and the cartels. Enough is enough, and you get what you deserve for continual lawlessness.

Your children and families receive less because of the drain on society’s limited resources — less quality of living to accommodate the needs of poor, desperate, undocumented, criminal illegal immigrants. So enjoy your new money-saving, secure wall.

Ronald Weaver, Pharr

 

‘To Honor’ our servicemen and servicewomen

I commend this area for honoring our servicemen and servicewomen and veterans on our national celebration days during the year. These are people who have served our country, giving their time and loyalty, and too many have given their lives throughout the years.

Our children should know why we celebrate these special days and give thanks to those who have contributed to the freedoms we all enjoy.

I grew up in a small town that always celebrated our nation’s heritage, so it’s something for which I have respect and great appreciation.

Services honoring our heroes seem to be celebrated in all of our communities. We express our admiration and gratitude. Thanks to all of them from all of us.

Below is my poem, “To Honor.”

Honor those who fought and died,

Think of them with love and pride;

Fighting wars so far and wide,

While their families mourned and cried.

How many borders have we crossed,

Trudging through the mud and frost?

We’ll never know what war has cost,

Or what our USA has lost.

To your flag be ever true,

As it waves red, white, and blue.

Remember those who fought for your,

Give them the respect they’re due.

Soldiers have suffered, they’ve had their fill,

Many of them suffer still,

Remembering those they had to kill;

Being in war is a bitter pill.

So kneel by a grave where poppies grow

As they’re swaying to and fro.

Pray for him who lies below,

Give thanks to one you’ll never know.

Thomas Shaper, Pharr

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