Edinburg EDC relocating to City Hall

The Edinburg Economic Development Corporation (EDC) will be closing its current offices and moving into City Hall, Board President and city council member Gilbert Enriquez said Monday.

The move is part of the new board’s latest attempt to cut costs. New board members, appointed in November, have already cut ties with several lobbying and consulting firms, as well as other contractual obligations.

The relocation will also help the city streamline services for potential investors, offering a one-stop shop for anyone looking for more information.

“So when potential developers come in to City Hall, they are able to go to every department and get the answers they need in order to continue with the development they want to do in Edinburg,” Enriquez said. “We just thought it was a logical move, and it’s a cost-saving move.”

When asked about the projected savings, Enriquez replied: “Just the utilities alone and the potential income that we’re losing from not being able to rent that facility out — I would say significant.”

Staff is taking inventory of all of the EDC’s assets, including files and furniture, Enriquez said. And while plans have been set, a move-in date has yet to be announced.

“There’s really not a time table — other than we’re moving as soon as the staff packs up all the stuff that’s going to be moved into City Hall,” he said.

The plan is to move EDC staff into offices located near the offices of the city manager and city attorney, he said.

“When they built City Hall, originally, the EDC was going to be out of City Hall,” Enriquez said.

The council member was involved in the construction of the facility through his father’s company, which the previous administration called into question last year when a wooden panel fell from the ceiling above the council chambers.

The previous council discussed a possible lawsuit, but action has yet to be taken.

“The EDC is an extension of the city of Edinburg, therefore it’s only logical that they’re in the same building so they can utilize planning and zoning and engineering… as well as the city manager’s office,” Enriquez said.

Nlopez@themonitor.com