LETTERS: On California wildfires, juvenile offenders, conservatives and CHIP

‘Tree huggers’ to blame in California

The tree huggers in California are part of the trifecta of what is problematic in controlling the fires in that state, not global warming as claimed by Hillary Clinton recently at a speech last week. The liberals in California stopped logging companies from harvesting trees and thinning out the herd, so to speak. An overabundance of trees combined with dead trees, many of which died from beetle infestation (not drought as the climate changers claim), and lastly the encroachment of humans on heavily forrested areas, makes for the perfect fire storm.

We continue to build in flood zones along the coast and when a hurricane hits, the climate changers call it a monster storm due to global warming. As populations grow along these coastal areas the risk of devastation grows. The storms are not getting any bigger they are just hitting areas that are more densely populated. The 1900 hurricane that struck Galveston killing over 6,000 people was not caused by global warming. Those people just had the misfortune of living where a Category 4 hurricane made a direct hit. As humans, we have become so vain that we blame the planet for our follies. Our planet is just fine at 4.5 billion years old and it’s going strong. To think that 200 years of human industrialism has damaged the climate after billions of years of volcanic activity and natural disasters, human arrogance astounds me.

Jake Longoria, Mission

Raise the age of juvenile offenders in Texas

Do you want to see fairness and justice prevail or do you require your pound of flesh? Texas is one of only six states in the nation that automatically charges children under the age of 18 as an adult, regardless of how minor the crime. The state has charged 17-year-olds as adults for nearly a century. I believe Texas should raise the age of juvenile jurisdiction to 18. The current outdated system leads to exactly what we don’t want — repeat offenders and wasted money. Unlike the adult system, the juvenile system both punishes and treats the child, and it holds the parents accountable too. Children are also very vulnerable to physical and sexual assaults in the adult system.

Raising the age would save Texas taxpayers millions as fewer repeat offenders means fewer kids in our jails. Remember when we demand our pound of flesh, we affirm the same standard that also condemns us, but we are blessed when the cross informs our passion for justice and fairness. Tell your legislator to raise the age.

Omar Villarreal, Harlingen

Defining ‘limited-government conservatives’

It is about time that someone who is “in the know” told you and your readers the truth about a phrase that is very often used by today’s “conservatives.” That phrase is “limited-government conservative.” To me, those are the three most frightening words in the English language. You might have noticed recently that some conservatives feel very badly because, as they have said, President Donald Trump is not as much of a “limited-government conservative” as they are. That happens to be true. That phrase is actually a “buzzword” and “codeword” that really means that the person does not believe that the federal government should spend one cent on social programs that are intended to help people. Their ultimate goal, I believe, is to one day see that all of them are abolished/eliminated from existence especially Social Security, which they hate the most.

Stewart Epstein,

Rochester, New York

Don’t cut health insurance for Texas children

The Childrens Health Insurance (CHIPS) is humane and right. The program offers low-cost health coverage for children from birth through age 18. It’s obvious that the narcissistic hate mongers and their Republican cronies don’t know that. Leaving children unprotected is inhumane. How can they live with themselves? They are evil gluttons.

Juan Menchaca,

Edinburg

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