LETTERS: On better driving and funding UTRGV School of Medicine

Obey traffic laws

Why is it hard to comply with traffic laws? Ignoring traffic signs can be very dangerous. There have been many accidents in the Rio Grande Valley due to people not following the laws.

Is it so difficult to comply with the speed limit? Why are people speeding in school zones? Why do people refuse to follow “Do not use cell phone” signs in school zones? Why do motorists run red lights?

These violations have resulted in car accidents, people getting run over, injured and even deaths.

There are many ways to prevent accidents. Leave your home earlier to allow plenty of time to get to your destination. Don’t use your cellphone while driving. And follow speed signs; especially in school zones. I believe the community should be more aware when it comes to traffic signs while driving. The amount of deaths increases each year due to irresponsible drivers ignoring these signs. I urge our community to contact lawmakers for better enforcement of these laws to help prevent accidents.

Sonia Moreno, Edinburg

Funding UTRGV School of Medicine

A recent Monitor editorial on funding the UTRGV School of Medicine got me to thinking. I believe the University of Texas, and the State of Texas have more than enough money to fund the UTRGV School of Medicine. The University of Texas Endowment fund has over $30 billion and the Texas Rainy Day Fund has over $16 billion. So why didn’t Texas lawmakers tap into these readily available funds of wealth to fund the UTRGV medical school for the next two years?

Is it about the strings attached? If funds come from those pools of wealth, its use would be strictly monitored with no room for waste. But if they get Hidalgo homeowners to foot the bill then oversight of the funds is controlled here locally where there is less accountability, and waste, diversion and misallocation of funds are the name of the game.

Jake Longoria, Mission

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