LETTERS: On ‘fast food babysitting,’ transparent government and new cartoon

Fast food babysitting

Since last summer some friends and I have noticed that some adults, hopefully parents, were dropping off children at local fast food restaurant playgrounds.

These children are left at the playground area alone. We saw one woman instruct an older child, she looked to be about 12 years old, to buy combos later and watch the young boys.

On another occasion, we were able to talk to a 100-year-old boy and his 7-year-old brother who told us their mom lets them play at the fast food restaurants almost every day while she runs errands.

Recently we saw the same activity at a local library. Children were dropped off and without any adult relative supervision. What is going on?

Manuel Pescador Jr., McAllen

Transparent government

Congratulations to state Sen. Juan “Chuy” Hinojosa, D-McAllen, and state Rep. Terry Canales, D-Edinburg, for their efforts during the 85th Legislature in promoting good government and transparency therein. The passage of the AGUA SUD bill in its original wording, which eliminated grandfathering and broadening the employment base, was needed both locally and to serve notice to other similar activities throughout the county and state. Even though Canales’ bill failed due to the nefarious actions of one of those Republicans who talks open government then votes against it; I urge him to bring it back the next session. It should be asked of the groups that watch our legal system and those who constantly complain of the media being too liberal; who sold open government down the river this time?

Ned Sheats, Mission

An ‘F’ for ‘F minus’

I’m surprised you still have the cartoon “F minus” on the comics page. This cartoon is not funny and most times makes no sense. The artwork is terrible. Please replace it. A good replacement would be “Pickles,” which is very funny.

Ronald Norbie, Mission

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